Alberta Transportation partners with Alberta Health, Alberta Health Services and the Injury Prevention Centre to help Albertans learn more about occupant restraints

Proper use of a child safety seat or booster seat can reduce the likelihood of your child being injured or killed in a crash by up to 75 per cent.

Child Safety Seat Facts:

  • Always refer to the car seat manufacturer’s instructions for the maximum weight and height limits of the child’s particular car seat, and to the vehicle manual for installation instructions.
  • In Alberta, the fine for not wearing a seat belt or child safety seat is $155.
  • A child is safest staying rear-facing until he/she is at least 2 years of age or reaches the maximum weight or height limit of the rear-facing seat, as stated by the manufacturer.
  • Once a child is at least 2 years of age or reaches the maximum weight or height limit of their rear-facing car seat, as stated by the manufacturer, he/she can move into a forward-facing car seat.
  • Once a child reaches the maximum weight or height limit of their forward-facing car seat, as stated by the manufacturer, he/she can move into a booster seat.
  • Without a booster seat, a child is three and a half times more likely to suffer a significant injury.
  • All child passengers are safest when secured in proper restraints based on their age, height and weight and those restraints are used according to the restraint and vehicle manufacturer's instructions. 
  • Children under the age of 13 are safest in the back seat.
  • If a child safety seat has been involved in a collision, replace it immediately.

Find out if it's time to lose the booster seat.

Seat Belt Facts:

  • A child is ready to exit his/her booster seat when the vehicle seat belt fits properly; this is typically when a child is 145 cm (4’9”) tall and between 8 and 12 years of age.
  • Properly used seatbelts can reduce fatal and serious injury by 45-65 per cent depending on the type of vehicle and seating position.
  • Collision involved restraint users had a much lower injury rate (6.8 per cent) than those not using restraints (24.1 per cent). Occupants using a restraint reduce the likelihood of sustaining an injury and the severity of injury decreases.
  • During 2016, 53 people who died and 375 people who sustained injuries were not properly restrained at the time of their collision.
  • Seat belts work in conjunction with other safety devices and distribute the force of a collision evenly to the stronger parts of a person's body.
  • Drivers are responsible to ensure that all passengers under the age of 16 are properly secured using wither a child safety seat or seat belt. Drivers may be fined for each unrestrained passenger under the age of 16.
  • Seat belts save about 1000 lives per year in Canada.

Learn more about seat belts